Slab surface tutorial for SeqQuest: CO/Ru(0001)


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Introduction

The purpose of this tutorial is to introduce the user to the effective use of the code for two-dimensional slab calculations for the study of surface properties of materials. This tutorial uses a series of examples used in setting up a calculation culminating in the adsorption CO on the Ru(0001) surface.

It will be helpful (but not necessary) in the following that the user already be somewhat familiar with use of the code for 3D bulk calculations (see the Bulk Tutorial). The appropriate lattice parameters to use in the surface plane are dictated by the corresponding bulk lattice parameters theoretically computed in the bulk material using the same level of approximation, so that 3D bulk calculations are a natural prerequisite to any 2D slab calculation to study chemistry at the surface of a material.

Two-dimensional slab calculations have special issues to consider in comparison to calculations for bulk materials, because the slab is periodic in two dimensions and is finite in one. The code must treat the boundary conditions differently in the periodic vs. the non-periodic directions. In addition, the code runs a formally a supercell calculation, treating a slab calculation as an infinite series of slabs separated by vacuum, and needs to be told where the "vacuum boundary" is in order to set up the boundary conditions correctly. These needs impose special requirements on a slab calculation that are reflected in the input conventions described below. First, note that the periodic directions of the slab unit cell must be in the x-y plane (the first two primitive lattice vectors), and that the third lattice vector (which must be specified) must be normal to the slab (i.e. along the z-axis). Second, while the code is formally a supercell code, and therefore subject to supercell effects such as the interaction between the planar dipoles of different slab images, Quest automatically and exactly eliminates the dipole interaction using the Local Moment CounterCharge (LMCC) method:
"Local electrostatic moments and periodic boundary conditions",
P.A. Schultz, Phys. Rev. B 60, 1551 (1999)

resulting in slabs that are Coulombically isolated from one another. With a localized basis set, that does not cross supercell boundaries, this means that the calculation does indeed represent an isolated slab.

Units

The default units for energy are Rydberg (1 Rydberg = 0.5 Hartree = 13.605 eV), and for distances are bohr (1 bohr = 0.52918 Ang = 0.052918 nm). All input coordinates will be in these units, though one can use the scaling functions in the code to aid in the conversions.

Input files

The code uses one main input file that the user must construct. Atom (potential+basis) files, which will need to be listed in the input file, can be obtained from the atom libraries. The input file is a text-rich keyword-driven document that, once constructed, is self-documenting. The input is a sequence of keyword lines with the indicated data on following lines. Only the first few (6 or 8) characters of the keyword line are significant. The remainder of a keyword line can be used for additional documentation. The data itself, in general, is free-format. The input in the setup data section is highly structured, and requires its input in a very specific order. Other sections take their data in any order. If you miss putting something in the right place in the input, not to worry. The code will very happily process the input file, and stop when it cannot find required input in the right place. It echoes the input file as it reads it, and will politely tell you what it was looking for when it runs into a problem. Interspersed among the required inputs, are a variety of usually invisible optional input sections. The code uses a variety of defaults that can be overridden in the input file. The use of many optional inputs will be illustrated in the tutorial.

Example: A basic input file

Illustrated in this first example is a very basic file for doing a 7-layer Ru(0001) slab calculation (i.e. the hexagonal surface of obtained by cleaving along the basal plane of bulk hcp Ru). In preparation to setting up this calculation, we had done a 3D bulk calculation for hcp Ru to determine the bulk lattice parameters (using the cell optimization capability of the code) using the same flavor of density functional theory we will be using for the slab calculations, the Perdew/Zunger parameterization of the Ceperley/Alder electron gas results (CAPZ) within LDA. Using a double-zeta-d basis for the Ru atom (ru2.atm in the current library), and a k-point sample of 12x12x8 in the bulk Brillouin Zone, the theoretical lattice parameters are a=5.025 bohr and c=7.94 bohr, and we use these values to construct our initial slab as seven unrelaxed layers cleaved from the bulk material.

Important: While a calculation with this input file will run to completion, this input file is flawed and would not be a viable production calculation because of an incorrect use of the Brillouin Zone sampling, which will be discussed in the next example.

Command options

The input file begins with a sequence of instructions to the code about the sort of calculation it will be doing. In this example, we will "do" a "setup" (the iteration independent integrals), and "do iters" (self-consistency), but "no force" and no relaxation. The "setup data" is the instruction to the code to read the data that describes the system. Please do not try to "do iters" with "no setup"!

Setup phase data

This section begins with a title line(s). The keyword "notes" signals that the next line is a text line that describes the nature of the problem. The keyword "end_notes" signals the end of the title section. The notes keyword and notes section are optional, but highly encouraged. Since the entire input file will be echoed into the output listing file, this provides a useful record of the nature of the calculation.

The "dimension" statement is the first required data in the input. We are doing a 2-dimensional slab problem. If we were doing a molecular system, we would enter a "0", or when we did the bulk hcp Ru problem before this slab calculation, we would have entered a "3" here.

The next required input is "primitive lattice" - supercell vectors. The periodic directions must be in the x-y plane, and the first two lattice vectors define the (1x1) cell for the (0001) surface of Ru. This surface is hexagonal, and we use the bulk theoretical lattice parameter a=5.025, and we start with the bulk interlayer spacing of 7.94 bohr.

In a 2-D slab calculation, the third lattice vector is the non-periodic direction and must be along the z-axis, normal to the slab plane. This lattice vector must be large enough so that the densities from the different periodic images of the slab do not interact. The effective range of the density about any atom is typically between 9-12 bohr (smaller for "hard" atoms like O, larger for metals), so that our lattice vector should be at least our slab thickness (3x7.94=~24 bohr) plus the range of the density on either side (2 x 11.0 used here = ~22) for a total of 46.0 bohr. I'll choose 48.0 to have a nice "round" number for the grid interval ...

The next required input is "grid dimensions". The code evaluates many of its integrals on a regular space (fft) grid. This regular grid is defined by taking the primitive lattice vectors, and dividing them into grid intervals. Here we use 15x15 in the plane, for a grid spacing of 0.335/point, and 150 grid intervals along the third lattice vector, a spacing of 0.320/point. The more grid intervals, the more accurately the integrals are evaluated, but, also, the more expensive the calculation. A general rule of thumb: you want spacing between points of 0.30-0.40 bohr for most systems, and 0.20-0.30 for finer accuracy in systems containing "hard" atoms. Hard atoms include late first row atoms like N, O, F, or late 3d atoms. Here we have a Ru slab, relatively soft, but later we will be adsorbing CO on the surface, which will require a denser mesh for the same accuracy. For a hexagonal slab, it is a good idea to use a grid dimension in the plane that is divisible by three, so that the various high-symmetry points in the surface (i.e., atop, hcp and fcc hollows) are at the same position with respect to the grid.

The next required input is the number of "atom types". For the clean slab there is only one type, the Ru. Later in this tutorial, we will add carbon and oxygen for a total of three atom types. The code then requires input to specify the atom file to be used to describe each atom type, and here we are reading the atom potential/basis information from the file "ru.atm".

Next, the input requires the number of atoms in the unit cell (7), and then a list of each "atom, type, and position". The arguments for an atom input are the atom index (the order of the atom in the list, #1-#7 here), which type (in the order in which the types were listed above), and the positions of the atoms in Cartesian coordinates (in bohr). Note that the slab is centered about Z=0. The code internally places the Z=0 position at the center of the supercell, so that the outer edges of the supercell is defined as vacuum. The code detects if the atoms and their density impinge on the cell boundary - giving a warning, or even stopping with an error message if the atoms are much to close to a vacuum boundary.

The final required input in the setup section (for a periodic calculation) is definition of the Brillouin Zone sampling. For molecular calculations this is unnecessary - one has only real integrals, or the "gamma-point", to worry about. In a (periodic) slab calculation, the Schroedinger equation generally needs to be solved for a sampling of points in reciprocal space. It is possible to input the k-point sampling as an explicit list of k-vectors and their weights (using a different keyword/data sequence than shown here), but this example takes advantage of an optional feature to automatically generates a simple k-point sample. The "kgrid " keyword tells the code to generate a regular mesh in reciprocal space, and here we specify an 6x6 grid in the x-y plane and must use a "0" for the non-periodic direction. A sample with just the gamma-point would be defined by 0x0x0. The kgrid command generates this grid, and offsets this grid from the reciprocal space origin (i.e., the gamma point) by (1/2,1/2,0) in the reciprocal space mesh, i.e., the body-centered position.

The final, required statement in the setup phase section is the "end setup phase" line.

Run phase data

The next section begins with the line "run phase" and ends with the line "end run phase", and allows you to modify parameters that affect the run (SCF) phase of the calculation. In this example, we modify the convergence criterion to be 0.0005. This criterion does NOT refer to the convergence of the energy in the SCF cycle, but rather refers to the maximum change in an Hamiltonian matrix element (integrals between basis functions over potentials). The value specified here will converge the total energy to roughly 1.d-6 Ry for this problem, but this will vary between different systems (e.g., a covalent system with a big energy gap will converge differently than a metallic system). Note that the convergence criterion is an optional parameter, and that the code will provide a default if you do not override it with this input.
do setup
do iters
no force
no relax
setup data
notes
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
primitive lattice vectors
  5.0250     0.000000000    0.00
  2.5125     4.351777654    0.00
  0.0000     0.000000000   48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector (cleaved bulk positions)
   1    1    2.5125     1.450592551   -11.91
   2    1    0.0000     0.000000000    -7.94
   3    1    2.5125     1.450592551    -3.97
   4    1    0.0000     0.000000000     0.00
   5    1    2.5125     1.450592551     3.97
   6    1    0.0000     0.000000000     7.94
   7    1    2.5125     1.450592551    11.91
kgrid
 12 12 0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Hexagonal symmetries and BZ sampling

In the previous we mentioned that there was a problem with input file. The problem, of course, lies in the Brillouin Zone sampling generated by the "kgrid " command and the fact that we have a hexagonal system. "Of course" because this is the same issue you would have dealt with in setting up the hcp bulk Ru calculation in preparation for the surface slab calculation. This command, by construction, offsets the grid of k-points to a have the gamma-point at the body-centered position, which, for a hexagonal system, is a reciprocal space grid that is not symmetric about the gamma point. For cubic and many other systems, a k-sample offset from gamma is more efficient. However, for hexagonal systems, the resulting BZ mesh is not symmetric about the gamma point. To preserve the symmetry, we must not offset the k-space grid from the gamma-point in the x-y plane, and changing the "kgrid" command to "kgrid2" accomplishes this.

In addition, note that we have expanded our input notes on this system and we have added two line of notes. This method can be used to have up to 20 lines of notes.

do setup
do iters
no force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Bulk LDA hcp Ru: a0=5.025 bohr=2.659 A, c/a=1.580 (k=12x12x8)
 Example: hex cell needs special hex Brillouin Zone sample: "kgrid2"
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
primitive lattice vectors
  5.0250     0.000000000    0.00
  2.5125     4.351777654    0.00
  0.0000     0.000000000   48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    2.5125     1.450592551  -11.91
   2    1    0.0000     0.000000000   -7.94
   3    1    2.5125     1.450592551   -3.97
   4    1    0.0000     0.000000000    0.00
   5    1    2.5125     1.450592551    3.97
   6    1    0.0000     0.000000000    7.94
   7    1    2.5125     1.450592551   11.91               
kgrid2                                                    
 12 12  0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Picking a density functional (and spin)

By default, the code runs a spin-restricted LDA calculation, using the Perdew-Zunger parameterization of the Ceperley-Alder electron gas results (CAPZ). However, the code is capable of spin-polarized and GGA calculations, too. Add the "functional" keyword between the notes section and dimension statement, and select the desired functional. The available functionals include: CAPZ, LDA (which defaults to CAPZ), PBE, PW91, BLYP and GGA (which defaults to PBE). Note that atom files are functional-specific. However, the code does not check that atom files and calculations be the same flavor of DFT. It is possible to use PBE atoms in PW91 calculations, for example, and get good results. However, mixing functionals (atoms and calculations) is not advised, and mixing GGA and LDA is dangerous. Note also that if you change functionals in the slab calculations, you should also change the surface lattice parameters to conform with the theoretical bulk lattice parameter appropriate to that new functional. Since this example simply made explicit the default LDA here, we kept the same lattice parameter.

We did not select spin polarization in this slab example, but in the general case, to invoke spin, one specifies a spin-polarized functional. All current DFT functionals are spin-capable. The valid choices include: LDA-SP, CAPZSP, PBE-SP, PW91SP, etc. If one specifies a spin polarized functional, additional input is *required* immediately following the functional. The keyword "spin polarization" with the net spin polarization must be given. The spin polarization is in units of excess electrons of majority spin, must be non-negative (it can be zero), but need not be an integer. For example, an LDA hydrogen atom (or a molecule with a single dangling bond)

functional
 LDA-SP
spin polarization
 1.0000
will have a polarization of exactly one, i.e., one more electron of majority spin than minority spin.
do setup
do iters
no force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: specify fcnal as Perdew/Zunger param of Ceperley/Alder (=LDA)
end_notes                                                               
functional
 CAPZ                                                                   
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
primitive lattice vectors
  5.0250     0.000000000     0.00
  2.5125     4.351777654     0.00
  0.0000     0.000000000    48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    2.5125     1.450592551   -11.91
   2    1    0.0000     0.000000000    -7.94
   3    1    2.5125     1.450592551    -3.97
   4    1    0.0000     0.000000000     0.00
   5    1    2.5125     1.450592551     3.97
   6    1    0.0000     0.000000000     7.94
   7    1    2.5125     1.450592551    11.91
kgrid2
 12 12  0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Symmetry

Our slab has symmetries, and our calculation should take advantage of it. Around the origin defined in the atomic coordinates, we have a three-fold rotation (about the z-axis), and a number of reflection planes. The code does not (yet) find the symmetries automatically from the input coordinates, nor can you tell it the space group and have it automatically generate a crystal. You must tell it explicitly what symmetries to use. We build symmetry into our calculation using the "symops" keyword. This is the number of symmetries which we use to define the symmetry group. Then we provide the "definitions" of these symmetry elements. Symmetries are defined by seven parameters: an integer and two three-vectors. The integer defines the nature of the symmetry, the first three-vector the axis of that symmetry, and the final three-vector is a translation vector which we will ignore - and set to (0,0,0) - for now. The integer describes the order of a rotation, an inversion, or a reflection, and can take the following valid values:
  2, 3, 4, 6 = an N-fold rotation
 -2,-3,-4,-6 = an N-fold rotation followed by inversion
 -1 = an inversion
Note that a reflection is equivalent to "-2", or a two-fold rotation plus inversion. The definitions in our example:
   3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
  -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
specify a three-fold rotation around (0,0,1), i.e., the z-axis, and a rotation around the x-axis plus inversion, which is equivalent to a reflection through the y-z plane. The code will internally take these symmetry elements and generate a full symmetry group.

The code takes advantage of symmetry in two ways. First, it eliminates redundant symmetry-equivalent k-points in the Brillouin Zone sample, and reduces the sample to be in the irreducible BZ. This makes the size of the calculation smaller, and therefore faster. Second, if the calculation does forces and a relaxation, it will symmetrize the force calculation (in a grid-based calculation, numerical noise may cause the calculation to artificially break symmetry) and conserves symmetry in geometry updates during an energy minimization calculation/relaxation.

do setup
do iters
no force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: take advantage of hexagonal symmetry about 001 axis (symops).
end_notes
functional
 CAPZ
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
primitive lattice vectors
  5.0250     0.000000000     0.00
  2.5125     4.351777654     0.00
  0.0000     0.000000000    48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    2.5125     1.450592551   -11.91
   2    1    0.0000     0.000000000    -7.94
   3    1    2.5125     1.450592551    -3.97
   4    1    0.0000     0.000000000     0.00
   5    1    2.5125     1.450592551     3.97
   6    1    0.0000     0.000000000     7.94
   7    1    2.5125     1.450592551    11.91
kgrid2
 12 12  0                                                               
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0                                     
end setup phase data
run phase input data
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Scaling functions I: periodic scaling

If we wish to modify the surface cell parameters (e.g., because of a changed bulk lattice parameter from using a different functional), changing all the lattice vectors and all the atomic positions that are given in Cartesian coordinates and units of bohr is not convenient. You would need to modify every coordinate vector in the input file, a tedious process very prone to human error. The code provides some simple tools to make this kind of manipulation easier. A useful one for slab calculations is the "scaleu" command. This command (like all the other scaling commands) must appear after dimension and before primitive lattice vectors. The "scaleu" scales every coordinate in periodic directions by the specified value. Here, we use the scaleu command to abstract the surface lattice parameter 5.025 from every x-y coordinate, leaving the z-coordinate (i.e. the non-periodic direction) unchanged. Now, to modify the surface lattice parameter, we need only modify the scaling value, and need not touch the various coordinate vectors in the input.
do setup
do iters
no force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: insert periodic scaling factor (a=5.025), and scale coordinates
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2           
scaleu
 5.025       
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000    0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378    0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000   48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   -11.91
   2    1    0.0000     0.00000000000    -7.94
   3    1    0.5000     0.28867513459    -4.97
   4    1    0.0000     0.00000000000     0.00
   5    1    0.5000     0.28867513459     3.97
   6    1    0.0000     0.00000000000     7.94
   7    1    0.5000     0.28867513459    11.91
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Scaling functions II: direction-specific

The scaling function "scaleu" of the previous example simplified the description of the coordinates within the plane. However, on occasion it might be useful/convenient to rescale the coordinates normal to the slab, e.g., to simplify the interlayer spacings. The code has a direction-specific scaling function "scalez" through which all z-coordinates can be scaled by a specified value. It comes immediately after the "scaleu" input. Here, we use this scaling to have the interlayer spacing of the bulk slab rescaled to 1.0.

Important: Note that the scaling modifies the atomic coordinates, but does NOT modify the non-periodic lattice vector length! This is intentional. The units of the cell vectors in non-periodic directions cannot be modified by the scaling functions.

do setup
do iters
no force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: insert z-scaling factor (c/a), and scale z-coordinates
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025      
scalez
 3.97       
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  48.00   (NB: not scaled)
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -3.0000 
   2    1    0.0000     0.00000000000  -2.0000 
   3    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -1.0000 
   4    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.0000 
   5    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   1.0000 
   6    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   2.0000 
   7    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   3.0000 
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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SCF parameters

In this example we show how to modify parameters that are important in the self-consistency calculations. These parameters are modified in the run phase section of the input file. The input can be in any order within this section (contrast this with the strict order of the input in the setup section). In the first example, the convergence criterion had already been specified. Here we also specify the maximum number of iterations for the self-consistency step, a "temperature" (in Ry) for level occupations (fermi-broadened, this is only really important for metallic systems, not systems with a significant gap. It aids in convergence in systems with many levels near the fermi level, i.e., metals), and an initial "blend ratio". The blend parameter can occasionally aid convergence. It sets the proportion of output potential to mix into the input potential after the first step of the self-consistency cycle (after the first cycle, a modified Broyden blending scheme updates the potential). It must take values between zero and one. There are other parameters which are also accessible from the input file, but these are the most commonly needed.
do setup
do iters
no force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: add various interesting scf options
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025
scalez
 3.97
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -3.0000
   2    1    0.0000     0.00000000000  -2.0000
   3    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -1.0000
   4    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.0000
   5    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   1.0000
   6    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   2.0000
   7    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   3.0000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data                                           
iterations - maximum number of scf iterations allowed
 35
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio - initial blend of input/output potential in scf
 0.30                                                          
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Atomic relaxation

In our example of the slab, the atoms will certainly wish to move from their bulk-terminated positions at the surface. Simple enough, to perform a geometry relaxation: turn on a force calculation with "do force" and use "do relax" to tell the code to do an energy minimization. The calculation will eliminate forces to find equilibrium positions of the atoms.
do setup
do iters     
do force
do relax     
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: set commands to do atomic relaxation
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025
scalez
 3.97
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -3.0000
   2    1    0.0000     0.00000000000  -2.0000
   3    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -1.0000
   4    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.0000
   5    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   1.0000
   6    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   2.0000
   7    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   3.0000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Relaxation parameters

The code, by default, will relax all atoms in the problem until the maximum force is less than an internally specified force threshold (0.003 Ry/bohr). The user can modify how the relaxation is performed in the optional geometry section of the input. The "geometry relaxation" statement begins, and the "end geometry" statement ends, the section that allows access to a variety of parameters that control the relaxation phase of the calculation. These inputs can be in any order in the geometry section. Here, "gsteps" limits the number of geometry steps to 10, "gconv" sets the force convergence criterion to 0.001 Ry/bohr, and we fix the atom in the center of the slab (#4) with "gfixed". This keyword "freezes" all the atoms in the specified sequence, while allowing the others to relaxed. This keyword can be entered more than once to select multiple sequences to be fixed. Alternatively, two separate "grelax" commands
grelax (sets atoms 1,2,3 to be relaxed)
 1 3
grelax (adds atoms 5,6,7 to set to be relaxed)
 5 7
would accomplish the same thing, relaxing atoms #1-3 and #5-7 while fixing all others (i.e.#4). While either can be used multiple times, they are mutually exclusive, and cannot both be used in the same input file.
do setup
do iters
do force
do relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: modify atomic relaxation optimization parameters
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025
scalez
 3.97
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -3.0000
   2    1    0.0000     0.00000000000  -2.0000
   3    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -1.0000
   4    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.0000
   5    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   1.0000
   6    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   2.0000
   7    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   3.0000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500                                               
geometry relaxation
gsteps - restrict the number of geometries to relax
 10
gconv  - max force convergence criterion
 0.0010
gfixed - fix atom 4 in place while relaxing everything else
  4 4
end geometry relaxation                                 
end run phase data
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Lattice coordinates

For some problems, it may be convenient to specify positions of the atoms in lattice units rather than Cartesian coordinates. The "coordinates" keyword, immediately after the dimension input, and before any scaling input, allows the user to switch the coordinate system used for the input of atoms. The choice of "LATTICE" specifies lattice units (as opposed to the default "CARTESIAN"). The atom x-y positions are constructed from the input vector (x,y,z) by: xA + yB where A, B, and C are the primitive lattice vectors. Important note: for a slab (ndim=2) calculation, only the periodic x-y coordinates of the atoms are converted to lattice coordinates. The z-lattice vector is totally unaffected (since this is not a periodic direction).
do setup
do iters
do force
do relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: transform coordinates into lattice units
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2            
coordinates
 LATTICE      
scaleu
 5.025
scalez
 3.97
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector - converted to lattice units
   1    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333  -3.0000
   2    1    0.000000000000   0.000000000000  -2.0000
   3    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333  -1.0000
   4    1    0.000000000000   0.000000000000   0.0000
   5    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333   1.0000
   6    1    0.000000000000   0.000000000000   2.0000
   7    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333   3.0000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500
geometry relaxation
gsteps - restrict the number of geometries to relax
 10
gconv  - max force convergence criterion
 0.0010
gfixed - fix atom 4 in place while relaxing everything else
  4 4
end geometry relaxation
end run phase data
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Cell optimization

The code as able to do cell shape optimization automatically for all LDA and GGA (and spin-polarized GGA stress is completed as of v2.57) calculations, for any dimension of periodicity. In fact, one can equilibrate at zero pressure, to a fixed non-zero pressure, to a uniaxial stress, or even a fully general stress tensor!

For this Ru slab example, you would not want to do such a cell optimization as the cell parameters are determined by the bulk lattice parameter. This example is for illustration purposes only, to show how one would do a 2D cell optimization for a system where such an optimization might be desired, e.g., a single graphite sheet.

To invoke cell optimization, add "do cell" to the instructions at the beginning of the input. The optional cell section , beginning with "cell optimization" and ending with "end cell", allows some control over cell optimization. This is illustrated here by setting the unit cell convergence threshold (uc_conv) to a maximum stress of 0.01 x 10^2 N/m^2.

Important: Cell optimization requires:

do setup
do iters
do force
do relax   
do cell    
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, unrelaxed cleaved bulk positions
 Example: turn on cell optimization (2D)
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2                                   
coordinates
 LATTICE
primitive lattice vectors
  5.0250     0.000000000    0.00
  2.5125     4.351777654    0.00
  0.0000     0.000000000   48.00     
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333  -3.0000
   2    1    0.000000000000   0.000000000000  -2.0000
   3    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333  -1.0000
   4    1    0.000000000000   0.000000000000   0.0000
   5    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333   1.0000
   6    1    0.000000000000   0.000000000000   2.0000
   7    1    0.333333333333   0.333333333333   3.0000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500
geometry relaxation
gsteps - restrict the number of geometries to relax
 10
gconv  - max force convergence criterion
 0.0010
gfixed - fix atom 4 in place while relaxing everything else
  4 4
end geometry relaxation                        
cell optimization
uc_conv - stress convergence (in 10^2 N/m^2)
 0.01
end cell                                       
end run phase data
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Clean relaxed surface

When we do the clean 7-layer slab relaxation with a double-zeta-d basis set for Ru, the code converges to the following relaxed geometry after eight steps:
      1            1            0.5000000000    0.2886751346   -2.9726158569
      2            1            0.0000000000    0.0000000000   -2.0034384252
      3            1            0.5000000000    0.2886751346   -1.0077494704
      4            1            0.0000000000    0.0000000000    0.0000000000
      5            1            0.5000000000    0.2886751346    1.0077319639
      6            1            0.0000000000    0.0000000000    2.0033998706
      7            1            0.5000000000    0.2886751346    2.9725643844
and gave a total energy for the relaxed cell of
FINAL RELAXED ENERGY = -232.0082242149
The small amount of asymmetry in the relaxation on the two sides of the slab is negligible, and due to numerical noise. We could have eliminated this asymmetry by adding to the input symmetry the x-y reflection plane, but we will not be using that symmetry in the adsorption calculations, and omitting that symmetry also gives a useful measure of the numerical noise in the calculation (if the asymmetry were more pronounced, we would know that something was flawed in the design of the calculation). For setting up the clean relaxed slab which will be our substrate for the adsorption studies, we will remove the noise (approximately averaging over the two sides of the slab) and put the layers at +/-1.00774, 2.00342, and 2.97259. From this we can see that the top layer spacing (d12) reduced by 3.2% and d23 decreased by 0.4%, and d34 increased by 0.8% from the bulk values. For the purposes of the adsorption calculation, it is useful to remove the scaling in the z-direction, so that the relaxed clean slab is given by the following input file. This will be our substrate for adsorption.
do setup
do iters
do force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) surface: 7-layer slab, fully relaxed clean surface
 Example: set up a clean substrate system
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  48.00
grid dimensions
  15 15  150
atom types
   1
atom file
 ru.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   7
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.5000     0.28867513459 -11.80118
   2    1    0.0000     0.00000000000  -7.95358
   3    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -4.00073
   4    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.00000
   5    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   4.00073
   6    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   7.95358
   7    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  11.80118
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Adsorbed atoms: (1x1) CO/Ru(0001)

Finally, in this example, we are adsorbing CO onto the clean surface. To begin, we are constructing a very dense 1.0 monolayer coverage of CO on Ru, with the CO, carbon end down, sitting vertically in an atop site. In this configuration, the symmetry of the underlying surface is preserved, and we would like to keep this if possible (contrast this with the lowered symmetry that one would have if CO were to be placed in a bridge site between two surface atoms).

A number of practical issues arise in constructing the calculation associated with this physical picture. First, we must consider the effect of the supercell approximation. If one puts adsorbates on one surface of the slab, the total system, adsorbate plus substrate, will, in general, have a net dipole. In a conventional supercell calculation, the Coulomb potential at the surface is corrupted by dipole potentials from the artificial periodic images of the slab. To avoid this problem, practitioners will frequently cover both surfaces with adsorbates so that the slab will have no net dipole, at the cost of a larger calculation. In this code, this is NOT necessary as the code automatically and exactly removes the artificial dipole arising from the supercell approximation using the LMCC (Local Moment CounterCharge) method:
"Local electrostatic moments and periodic boundary conditions",
P.A. Schultz, Phys. Rev. B 60, 1551 (1999)

(which should be cited in any calculation for a polar surface). Hence, we need only place adsorbates on one side of the slab.

We need an initial configuration for the CO on the surface. We assume for setting up this adsorption calculation that we have no helpful information (such as experimental data, or other theoretical results) for the various bond distances at the surface (Ru-CO RuC-O). For the initial C-O distance at the surface, we use the equilibrium bond distance computed for molecular CO within LDA: 2.15 bohr (=1.14 Angstrom). For the initial Ru-CO distance, we will use half the Ru-Ru distance (5.025/2=2.5 bohr) and half the C-O distance (2.15/2=1.1 bohr) for a total Ru-C distance of 3.6 bohr. The top Ru atom at the surface sits at z=11.80118, so that we will place the C at 11.80118+3.6=15.40 and our O at z=15.40+2.15=17.55 for the initial guess. We add two atom types, carbon and oxygen, for a total of three types, and the appropriate atom files, and add the C and O to our list of atoms (for a total of nine atoms) and their initial coordinates.

The final issue is adjustment of the supercell. After adding the CO in the above guess, the oxygen sits at z=+17.55 bohr but our supercell spans z=-24.0 to z=+24.0 (48.0/2 around z=0) so that the oxygen atom is only 6.45 bohr away from a boundary. This might pass the internal check in the code, but we would really like to have at least 9 bohr to a boundary and probably more, as the atoms might move toward vacuum in the course of a relaxation. Hence, we would like to have the supercell boundary at least at z=+28.0-30.0 to ensure that the density around the oxygen will decay before the supercell (vacuum) boundary. For this example we will choose to set the boundary at +29.12 bohr. Why such a "strange" number? Because this is an increase of 5.12 bohr which simply extends the grid used for the bare slab by an integral number of points (5.12/.32=16 grid points).

We could increase the cell size by 5.12 bohr on both sides of the slab to give to give a total repeat vector of 5.12+48.00+5.12=58.24, with the corresponding total grid of 16+150+16=182. However, this would be wasteful, as we do not need the extra space on the clean side of the slab, just on the adsorbed side. By default, the code puts the coordinate origin (z=0) in the center of the supercell, but the code allows the user to shift the default origin through the use of the "origin" keyword as illustrated below, which instructs the code to shift the supercell center to the indicated location. The shift we use has the net effect of adding all the increased repeat vector on the adsorbed side, keeping fixed the vacuum region on the clean side of the slab. The slab repeat is now 48.00+5.12=53.12, with a new grid dimension of 150+16=166. The offset also happens to be an integral number of grid intervals, so that the grids used in the clean slab and the adsorbed surface are in registry, i.e., the Ru atoms in the substrate have the identical orientation with respect to the regular grid they had in the smaller clean slab cell.

do setup
do iters
do force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) relaxed 7-layer slab surface + (1x1) CO
 Example: adding CO onto a relaxed Ru surface
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00  
  0.0000   0.00000000000  53.12
grid dimensions
  15 15  166
atom types
   3                           
atom file
 ru.atm                        
atom file
 c.atm
atom file
 o.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   9                           
atom, type, position vector
   1    1    0.5000     0.28867513459 -11.80118
   2    1    0.0000     0.00000000000  -7.95358
   3    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  -4.00073
   4    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.00000
   5    1    0.5000     0.28867513459   4.00073
   6    1    0.0000     0.00000000000   7.95358
   7    1    0.5000     0.28867513459  11.80118   
    8    2   0.5000     0.28867513459  15.40
    9    3   0.5000     0.28867513459  17.55
origin
 0.0000 0.0000 2.56000                            
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
Return to Top

Aliasing atom types

Sometimes keeping track of atoms and which atom is which type can be confusing, particularly in larger input files with involved configurations. The code offers the ability to use named atoms and atom types in the input of the configurations, and to alias atom files to those atom types. There are two methods to alias the input atom files. One is explicit, as with the the Ru atom below. You provide the alias name and set it equal to the atom file: Ru = ru.atm. Alternatively, the code constructs a default from the atom file name, by using the file name prefix. From C.atm it abstracts the alias "C". From /library/lda/O.atm it abstracts the alias "O". Note that the code ignores the directory specification. Atom name aliases can be any character strings. To use the aliases in the input, simply replace the type numbers with the atom/type alias. Note: this is all or nothing. Use type names only, or use type numbers only.
do setup
do iters
do force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) relaxed 7-layer slab surface + (1x1) CO
 Example: aliasing atom types
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  53.12
grid dimensions
  15 15  166
atom types
   3
atom file      
 Ru = ru.atm   
atom file      
 C.atm         
atom file      
 /library/lda/O.atm         
number of atoms in unit cell
   9
atom, type, position vector
   bot_ru     Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459 -11.80118
   at2        Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000  -7.95358
   at3        Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459  -4.00073
   at4        Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.00000
   at5        Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459   4.00073
   sub_ru     Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000   7.95358
   top_ru     Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459  11.80118
   ad_carbon  C     0.5000     0.28867513459  15.40
   ad_h       O     0.5000     0.28867513459  17.55
origin
 0.0000 0.0000 2.56000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
Return to Top

Relaxing atoms

To do a geometry relaxation, add a do relax in the setup section. You can also add a geometry relaxation section to modify the state of the relaxation, e.g., to particularly in larger input files with involved configurations. The code offers the ability to use named atoms and atom types in the input of the configurations, and to alias atom files to those atom types. There are two methods to alias the input atom files. One is explicit, as with the the Ru atom below. You provide the alias name and set it equal to the atom file: Ru = ru.atm. Alternatively, the code constructs a default from the atom file name, by using the file name prefix. From C.atm it abstracts the alias "C". From /library/lda/O.atm it abstracts the alias "O". Note that the code ignores the directory specification. Atom name aliases can be any character strings. To use the aliases in the input, simply replace the type numbers with the atom/type alias. Note: this is all or nothing. Use type names only, or use type numbers only.
do setup
do iters
do force
no relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) relaxed 7-layer slab surface + (1x1) CO
 Example: aliasing atom types
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
scaleu
 5.025
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  53.12
grid dimensions
  15 15  166
atom types
   3
atom file      
 Ru = ru.atm   
atom file      
 C.atm         
atom file      
 /library/lda/O.atm         
number of atoms in unit cell
   9
atom, type, position vector
   bot_ru     Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459 -11.80118
   at2        Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000  -7.95358
   at3        Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459  -4.00073
   at4        Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.00000
   at5        Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459   4.00073
   sub_ru     Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000   7.95358
   top_ru     Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459  11.80118
   ad_carbon  C     0.5000     0.28867513459  15.40
   ad_h       O     0.5000     0.28867513459  17.55
origin
 0.0000 0.0000 2.56000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500                      
geometry relaxation
gsteps  - limit number of steps to 10
  10
gconv   - set the convergence criterion (max force/atom) to 0.001 Ry/bohr
 0.001
gmethod - specify the accelerated steepest descent method to relax
 ASD
grelax  - relax the top two layers of Ru and the adsorbed CO
  sub_ru   ad_h
end geomtry                    
end run phase data
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External electric field

As of Version 2.57, the code allows applying an external electric field. This is invoked by adding the keyword "efield" and the electric field vector, after the functional and before the scaling. Note that the field cannot have a non-zero component in a periodic direction, so that in the 2D slab case, the field must be along the z-direction. The units are Ry/bohr, and the field strength here, 0.038893 Ry/au, corresponds to applying a field of 100 MV/cm normal to the surface. The computed forces and stresses computed are fully consistent with field, hence, geometry relaxation and cell optimization will work properly in the presence of the field.
do setup
do iters
do force
do relax
setup data
notes 
 Ru(0001) relaxed 7-layer slab surface + (1x1) CO
 Example: applying an external electric field
end_notes
dimension of system (0=cluster ... 3=bulk)
 2
functional
 LDA                   
efield   (Ry/bohr)
  0.0  0.0  0.038893   
scaleu
 5.025
primitive lattice vectors
  1.0000   0.00000000000   0.00
  0.5000   0.86602540378   0.00
  0.0000   0.00000000000  53.12
grid dimensions
  15 15  166
atom types
   3
atom file
 Ru = ru.atm
atom file
 C.atm
atom file
 /library/lda/O.atm
number of atoms in unit cell
   9
atom, type, position vector
   bot_ru     Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459 -11.80118
   at2        Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000  -7.95358
   at3        Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459  -4.00073
   at4        Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000   0.00000
   at5        Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459   4.00073
   sub_ru     Ru    0.0000     0.00000000000   7.95358
   top_ru     Ru    0.5000     0.28867513459  11.80118
   ad_carbon  C     0.5000     0.28867513459  15.40
   ad_h       O     0.5000     0.28867513459  17.55
origin
 0.0000 0.0000 2.56000
kgrid2
 12 12  0
symops
 2
definitions sym ops (3-fold rotate around 001, reflection plane normal 100)
  3  0.0  0.0  1.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
 -2  1.0  0.0  0.0    0.0  0.0  0.0
end setup phase data
run phase input data
temperature for occupations (Ry)
 0.0030
blend ratio
 0.30
convergence criterion
 0.000500
end run phase data
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Return to Top or Input Manual or User Guides or SeqQuest Home
Send questions and comments to: Peter Schultz at paschul@sandia.gov
Last updated: June 12, 2015